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Dallas Camp Guide for Summer 2021

Find the best summer camps for kids in the Dallas TX Area for Summer 2021 – including Fort Worth, Plano, Frisco, Keller and surrounding areas.

Discover our most popular and trending camps in Dallas, TX – including outdoor camps, adventure camps, sports camps, LEGO® camps, maker camps, coding camps, and more! Learn more about camps updated programs for Summer 2021, including curriculum, group sizes, safety protocols, and cancellation policies.

Vision Martial Arts Camp in Plano, TX

Vision Martial Arts

Vision Martial Arts is a family-centered martial arts school offering in-person programs in Plano, TX and online classes to families everywhere. Vision Martial Arts specializes in character development and self-defense for kids of all ages and their families. Children become better learners through the development of focus, confidence, self- discipline and respect. They have camps all summer and classes year round, online and in-person!

Oklahoma Awesome Adventures

Oklahoma Awesome Adventures presents the 2021 Junior Elephant Ambassador Camp! This one-of-a-kind experience includes a one week overnight camp (5 days / 4 nights) located in Hugo, OK, close to Hugo Lake and right next door to the Endangered Ark Foundation, one of the nation’s largest private elephant facilities in the United States.

Participants will have a unique opportunity to learn about one of the world’s most endangered species – the Asian Elephant – up close and in person.  In addition to earning their Junior Elephant Ambassador Certification, Campers will also be provided with valuable lessons and enriching activities that will focus on Team Building, Leadership, Recreation Fun!

OutLoud Adventures

OutLoud Adventures was created by Jeffery Moffitt and Allison Caldwell to help youth form deeper connections with nature, build community, and explore the world around them. Jeffery and Allison have over 25 years of combined experience working with teenagers. They know that the key to an amazing summer adventure is the right route with the right people, and they take great pride in designing trips that are well paced, strike the perfect balance between challenging and rewarding, and are led by incredible educators that are experts at creating a sense of community from our very first meeting with the group. Their Summer 2021 small-group outdoor adventures depart from the DFW Airport and include options for epic explorations to the West Coast, Sedona, Seattle and Yellowstone.

United States Youth Volleyball

The United States Youth Volleyball League provides every child between the ages of 7 and 15 a chance to learn and play volleyball in a fun, safe, and supervised environment. While the program teaches children the skills necessary to excel in the sport of volleyball, the focus remains on participation, cooperation, sportsmanship, responsibility, and, of course, fun! Volleyball camps are being held in both Dallas and Cedar Park, TX for Summer 2021.

Destination Science

STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning is more important than ever before. At Destination Science, we say “Science is a Way of Thinking!” When we know how to “do” science, we know how to be creative, critical, and organized thinkers and problem solvers. In all of our activities, we teach children how to ask great questions and how to wonder out loud. Every day provides opportunities to create new things and imagine. At Destination Science, we use science to prepare your child for life! We’re safe, non-stop fun, so kids can’t wait to go every day! In-person Destination Science camp locations include Plano, Dallas, and Frisco, TX for Summer 2021.

Challenger Sports

Challenger Sports, the largest soccer camp company in North America will run over 1,200 camps this summer and utilize over 30 years of coaching experience! Locations in Texas include Rockwall, Frisco, Carrollton, Coppell, Flower Mound, Keller, and more! Challenger’s International Soccer Camp will contain a selection of age & ability appropriate drills and practices being used by five of the world’s top soccer countries (Brazil, France, Spain, UK and the US). Camp programs will include the innovative TinyTykes program, for ages 2-5. TinyTykes will feature fundamental soccer activities, games, and stories that have been designed to develop the technical, physical and social aspects of young players. The half-day and most popular player development program, for ages 5-16, will run for 3 hours each day and focus on coached skill development, games, challenges and competitions.

Breakthrough Basketball Camps

Breakthrough Basketball

Breakthrough Basketball conducts quality, high-intensity, drill based camps that focus on not only bettering a players skill set on the court but also building character and confidence off the court. These camps will strengthen your athletes mentality while boosting their confidence to become more aggressive and skilled players. Our camps will provide a focused, fun learning environment that cannot be rivaled. Breakthrough Basketball has camps across the country, including Texas locations in Abilene, Amarillo, Duncanville, Fort Worth, Houston, Iowa Park, Killeen, Lake Dallas, Lubbock, Perryton, Round Rock, and San Antonio.

Active Learning

Choose from USA Chess Camp or 7 different Video Game Creation Camps. Mix and match to create a fun-filled day for your child. At USA Chess Camp, professional chess instructors teach children of all abilities to play and improve their games. Each day consists of chess lessons and competitive play. Instructors are selected by USA Chess for their ability to make chess fun and teach the game to players of all levels. Our popular video game creation and animation camps let kids create & program their own video game. Using our custom curricula, children learn Minecraft, GameMaker, Kodu or Scratch as they create their very own video games that they can actually play!

KidzToPros

KidzToPros has built a trusted brand as an after-school and seasonal camp provider, partnering with over 400 schools in 14 metropolitan areas – including Dallas, TX. KidzToPros offers programs for grades K-8th, including: outdoor sports camps, LEGO® Masters, Minecraft and Roblox game design, art skills, graphic design, and more!

CodeWiz Reading (online)

Code Wiz offers a wide range of individualized STEM programs, each tailored to the students’ skill level for kids aged 7-17. Watch your kids expand their creativity through computer science with a student-driven, project-based learning approach.  Code Wiz programs include online camps and and single-day class programs for Robotics, Minecraft modding, Roblox, Game design, Animations, Digital Art, Mobile app development, Web development, Java, Python, etc.

iCode Sugarland

The goal of iCode Sugarland is to enrich the educational experience and capability of tomorrow’s entrepreneurs, engineers, artists, scientists, economists, thinkers and doers. Our students gain skills in collaboration, creativity and out-of-the-box thinking, through a process and proprietary curriculum that equips them with knowledge, confidence, leadership and project management skills. These skills are critical, as the global workforce increasingly demands innovators to solve ever-changing needs and crises. The demands are endless and through technology, so are the possibilities. Summer 2021 Camps include Minecraft Modding, LEGO® Robotics, YouTube production, and more!

Natl CSI

If you love CSI and forensics, this online STEM camp is for you! Taught by current and former detectives (how cool is that!), this camp is packed with hands-on activities to learn what it takes to become a crime scene investigator. Each student gets their own CSI Lab Kit shipped to them before the virtual class.Lift your own fingerprints and classify them, solve a missing persons case, analyze handwriting, and so much more! Ideal for students in grades 6 to 12 with an interest in law enforcement, science, and forensics. Each camp is capped at 10 students ensuring plenty of one-on-one guidance and mentorship from practicing CSI professionals – build your STEM skills and connections needed to succeed in the field. 

 

Find in-person Summer camps near me >>
Find online Summer camps and classes >>

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Camps Featured Posts Holiday Break Camps Parenting Resources School Breaks Sleep away camps

SoCal Camp Guide for Summer 2021

Camp Guide - Summer 2021

The best summer camps for kids in the Los Angeles and Orange County Areas for Summer 2021 – including Irvine, Glendale, Santa Monica, Redondo Beach, Palos Verdes, and more!

The Official Summer Camp Guide 2021 features our most popular and trending camps on ActivityHero – including outdoor camps, adventure camps, sports camps, LEGO® camps, maker camps, coding camps, and more! Learn more about camps’ updated programs for Summer 2021, including curriculum, group sizes, safety protocols, and cancellation policies.

Camp Galileo

Rediscover summer fun at Camp Galileo where 75% of time is spent outdoors! Camp Galileo combines traditional summer camp excitement with lasting, innovation-igniting learning for pre-K – 7th graders. Summer 2021 program themes in Irvine CA include National Parks Adventure, Toymakers, and Olympic Games – art, science, and outdoor fun! And, check out the worry-free enrollment policies.

Camp Cosmo

“Creativity is intelligence having fun.” Albert Einstein’s words are the backbone of every Cosmo class, whether its focus is academic, artistic, physical, or social. Founded by a parent in response to the global pandemic, Camp Cosmo’s goal is to reach kids at home and offer them an outlet for fun that goes way beyond video games or TV. Every Cosmo class is designed to inspire critical thinking, creative thought and social connections — through play.

KidzToPros

KidzToPros has built a trusted brand as an after-school and seasonal camp provider, partnering with over 400 schools in 14 metropolitan areas. Summer 2021 camp locations in SoCal include Redondo Beach, Glendale, Los Angeles, and more. KidzToPros offers programs for grades K-8th, including: outdoor sports camps, LEGO® Masters, Minecraft and Roblox game design, art skills, graphic design, and more!

UBTECH

UBTECH Education is passionate about preparing all learners for the future of work. Our solutions establish the strong foundation students need to thrive: a high-quality STEM education integrated with the development of 21st century skills and computational literacy. We are excited to return for a second year of virtual STEM camp for kids 8+ that features our UKIT and JIMU systems. We’ve created NEW, engaging courses with topics like music and self-driving cars to keep your kids engaged all summer long.

Summer Camps for kids in SoCal by LangoKids Irvine

LangoKids Irvine

LangoKids offers group classes to children ages 1-10. Kids acquire languages and are immersed in cultures through music, games, and art.

Musique Sur La Mer Orchestras and Academy of Music

La Petite Musique Training Orchestra (LPMO) is open to all instruments and all students with a minimum of one year of study on their instrument. This orchestra serves as both a first orchestral experience for young musicians and a training orchestra for Musique Sur La Mer Youth Symphony Orchestra.The Musique Sur La Mer Jazz Orchestra (MSLMJO) is a delightful combination of strings, woodwinds, brass and percussion. The music ranges from the American songbook to Latin jazz, swing, country, pop, alternative and rock.

Ramona Convent Secondary School

Summer session students enjoy active learning in our garden, arts studios, science and computer labs, gym, swimming pool, kitchen and classrooms throughout our more than 19 acre campus. Open to both boys and girls in grades 5-12, summer session prepares students for junior high and high school and offers opportunities for enrichment. Ramona also offers summer athletics programs to introduce students to new sports and to enhance the skills of current athletes.

United States Youth Volleyball (USYVL) Camps for Kids in SoCal

United States Youth Volleyball

The United States Youth Volleyball League provides every child between the ages of 7 and 15 a chance to learn and play volleyball in a fun, safe, and supervised environment. While the program teaches children the skills necessary to excel in the sport of volleyball, the focus remains on participation, cooperation, sportsmanship, responsibility, and, of course, fun!

Destination Science

STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning is more important than ever before. At Destination Science, we say “Science is a Way of Thinking!” When we know how to “do” science, we know how to be creative, critical, and organized thinkers and problem solvers. In all of our activities, we teach children how to ask great questions and how to wonder out loud. Every day provides opportunities to create new things and imagine. At Destination Science, we use science to prepare your child for life! We’re safe, non-stop fun, so kids can’t wait to go every day! 

Challenger Sports

Challenger Sports, the largest soccer camp company in North America will run over 1,200 camps this summer and utilize over 30 years of coaching experience! Camp locations in SoCal include Arcadia and Tustin. Challenger’s International Soccer Camp will contain a selection of age & ability appropriate drills and practices being used by five of the world’s top soccer countries (Brazil, France, Spain, UK and the US). Camp programs will include the innovative TinyTykes program, for ages 2-5. TinyTykes will feature fundamental soccer activities, games, and stories that have been designed to develop the technical, physical and social aspects of young players. The half-day and most popular player development program, for ages 5-16, will run for 3 hours each day and focus on coached skill development, games, challenges and competitions.

Basketball camps for kids in SoCal: Los Angeles and Irvine, CA with Breakthrough Basketball

Breakthrough Basketball

Breakthrough Basketball conducts quality, high-intensity, drill based camps that focus on not only bettering a players skill set on the court but also building character and confidence off the court. These camps will strengthen your athletes mentality while boosting their confidence to become more aggressive and skilled players. Our camps will provide a focused, fun learning environment that cannot be rivaled. Breakthrough Basketball has camps across the country, including locations in Los Angeles and Irvine.

Find in-person Summer camps near me >>
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Camps Featured Posts Holiday Break Camps Parenting Resources School Breaks Sleep away camps

Houston Camp Guide for Summer 2021

Find the best summer camps for kids in the Houston TX Area for Summer 2021 – including Katy, Sugar Land, Missouri City TX, and surrounding areas.

Discover our most popular and trending camps on ActivityHero – including outdoor camps, adventure camps, sports camps, LEGO® camps, maker camps, coding camps, and more! Learn more about camps updated programs for Summer 2021, including curriculum, group sizes, safety protocols, and cancellation policies.

KidzToPros

KidzToPros has built a trusted brand as an after-school and seasonal camp provider, partnering with over 400 schools in 14 metropolitan areas. KidzToPros offers programs for grades K-8th, including: outdoor sports camps, LEGO® Masters, Minecraft and Roblox game design, art skills, graphic design, and more!

CodeWiz Reading (online)

Code Wiz offers a wide range of individualized STEM programs, each tailored to the students’ skill level for kids aged 7-17. Watch your kids expand their creativity through computer science with a student-driven, project-based learning approach.  Code Wiz programs include online camps and and single-day class programs for Robotics, Minecraft modding, Roblox, Game design, Animations, Digital Art, Mobile app development, Web development, Java, Python, etc.

Texas Rock Gym

Texas Rock Gym has been offering Climbing Day Camps to Houston youth for over 15 years. Their camps are well structured, run by experienced counselors, and most of all… fun! Not sure of what to do with your kids when they have days off of school but you still have to work? Texas Rock Gym offers single-day and multi-day camps throughout the year.

A.D. Players Performing Arts Academy

Founded in 1992 by Jeannette Clift George, the A.D. Players Performing Arts Academy offers students a learning experience that engages their imaginations with the art-making and innovation of theatre. Individuals ranging from age 3-18 get a hands-on education, developing skills and knowledge across various departments from rehearsal and backstage to acting and music. These environments provide a fascinating look at the process of producing theatrical performances. A.D. Players academy will be “cruisin’ the sea!” during summer 2021 with fun themes including: Dance Party with Nemo, Music with Moana, Muppet Treasure Island, and more!

iCode Sugarland

The goal of iCode Sugarland is to enrich the educational experience and capability of tomorrow’s entrepreneurs, engineers, artists, scientists, economists, thinkers and doers. Our students gain skills in collaboration, creativity and out-of-the-box thinking, through a process and proprietary curriculum that equips them with knowledge, confidence, leadership and project management skills. These skills are critical, as the global workforce increasingly demands innovators to solve ever-changing needs and crises. The demands are endless and through technology, so are the possibilities. Summer 2021 Camps include Minecraft Modding, LEGO® Robotics, YouTube production, and more!

The Artistic Realm of Talentz

At the Artistic Realm of Talentz, their awesome and unique classes and camps are a great way for young aerialists ages 2-18 with no experience to learn the world of circus artz. Youth classes include portions focused on both skill development and play.

Natl CSI

If you love CSI and forensics, this online STEM camp is for you! Taught by current and former detectives (how cool is that!), this camp is packed with hands-on activities to learn what it takes to become a crime scene investigator. Each student gets their own CSI Lab Kit shipped to them before the virtual class.Lift your own fingerprints and classify them, solve a missing persons case, analyze handwriting, and so much more! Ideal for students in grades 6 to 12 with an interest in law enforcement, science, and forensics. Each camp is capped at 10 students ensuring plenty of one-on-one guidance and mentorship from practicing CSI professionals – build your STEM skills and connections needed to succeed in the field. 

Pro’s Katy Indoor Summer Fun Camp

Pro’s Katy Indoor Soccer strives to provide the best indoor soccer experience in Houston for all Adult and Youth players. They offer Year-round training for kids of all skill levels between 2-14 year olds. Every class is age-appropriate, managed by professional soccer trainers. At the Summer 2021 Technical Soccer Camp, campers will focus on technical and tactical skills daily, including speed and agility. Coaches will utilize the TOCA Touch Trainer in each session to help improve overall touch. Camper will also work on improving all fundamental skills like ball control, passing, receiving and finishing. 

True Knight Academy

True Knight Academy offers a student-centered approach for your exceptional child. They have a day school, after school, camps, brain-training therapies, an adult program and more on the way. True Knight Academy seeks to empower students with special needs within a Christ-centered environment, giving them a greater purpose and the opportunity to reach their potential socially and academically. The Summer 2021 Special Needs Camp focuses on fundamentals in reading, math and physical writing skills. These are facilitated through metronome—based activities to enhance brain development. Camp also includes fun field trips, including bowling, swimming, zoo, museums, ceramics, and more. 

OutLoud Adventures

OutLoud Adventures was created by Jeffery Moffitt and Allison Caldwell to help youth form deeper connections with nature, build community, and explore the world around them. Jeffery and Allison have over 25 years of combined experience working with teenagers. They know that the key to an amazing summer adventure is the right route with the right people, and they take great pride in designing trips that are well paced, strike the perfect balance between challenging and rewarding, and are led by incredible educators that are experts at creating a sense of community from our very first meeting with the group. Their Summer 2021 small-group outdoor adventures depart from the DFW Airport and include options for epic explorations to the West Coast, Sedona, Seattle and Yellowstone.

Find in-person Summer camps near me >>
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Camps Computer Animation Computers Gaming Lego Parenting Resources Programming Robotics Science/Technology

4 Ways to Get Your Child Started with Coding






Computer programming isn’t just for college students and hackers. Here are four engaging ways to get your kids started with coding.

By Ashley Wang

It’s pretty clear by now that technology is a force to be reckoned with. Tech companies are ever-growing and demand for programmers has never been higher. Computers dominate our lives right now, and they will dominate the lives of our children, as well.

So it’s not unexpected that many parents are interested in coding for kids. But getting them started can be rather tricky, especially if you don’t have too much experience with programming, yourself. Here, we highlight four ways to introduce your child to code.

1. Scratch

Used by millions of children around the world, Scratch is considered by educators to be the gold standard for teaching beginner coders the basics of programming. The reason? It uses blocks-based grammar that has users drag and drop commands rather than typing code. Because Scratch doesn’t require learning any complicated programming languages, even eight-year-old kids can use it.

Using the website, you can create everything from short animations to simple games. It’s intuitive, logical, and familiarizes kids with the computational thinking behind programming without overwhelming them with abstract ideas.

And if you want to get your child started even earlier, say at five-years-old, ScratchJr is the perfect learning tool. It doesn’t even require the ability to read; instead, children only need to connect together icon-based blocks to animate their characters.

Find Scratch camps & classes>>

2. Lego Robotics

Looking for a more hands-on experience for your child? Lego robotics might just be the perfect fit. Lego Mindstorms, a hardware-software platform produced by Lego for children aged 10 and up, combines the fun of Lego-building with the intellectual challenge of programming robots to walk, talk, and even think.

Calvin Grewal, a Palo Alto High School senior who interned at a startup as a web developer over the summer, thinks it’s especially great for keeping kids motivated because of the immediate results it lets them see.

“It’s a good way to make coding not so dry,” Grewal says. “Building a physical robot is definitely a lot more interesting, especially for younger kids.”

Grewal does, however, warn against having children learn robotics and coding without the proper assistance that is provided at robotics camps and classes.

“If you’re in high school then you may be able to study code on your own and be properly self-motivated,” Grewal says. “But for kids, camps are definitely better to help facilitate learning and engagement.”

Find Lego Robotics camps & classes>>

3. Game Design

Camps that teach video game design are another great option for children. Because if your kids can’t seem to peel their eyes away from their screens — be it iPads, laptops, or TV — then why not have them learn how to make a video game, themselves?

Grewal is a major proponent of game design camps, citing them as the reason for his initial interest in coding. He started over the summer in elementary school, where he was taught basic Python to develop a simple computer game. Because he was doing something he was already interested in, Grewal viewed learning something as complicated as coding as more of a fun activity rather than a school-related task.

Game design is also becoming a rapidly-growing industry. Especially with eSports on the rise, specialized software developers are needed now more than ever to help create the next bestselling video game.

Find Game Design camps & classes>>

4. School or Online Clubs

For kids that love interacting with their peers, joining a school or online coding club may offer additional benefits. While programming is often viewed as an individual activity done in solidarity, clubs encourage students with like-minded interests in coding to help each other out with tips and advice. Students often find it beneficial to have others help them troubleshoot their issues.

“It’s a good way to talk with other people who are interested,” Grewal says. “You learn from other people, who then learn from you.”

However you plan to approach coding for kids, it’s important to always keep an open mind. Because no matter how much they may like legos or game design, it’s still possible that coding just isn’t the right activity for them. But starting by gauging your child’s interest with some of these tips wouldn’t hurt, and perhaps they might just become the next tech founder.

>> Find more coding camps & classes on ActivityHero
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Adventure/Outdoors Biking Guest Posts Keeping Kids Active, Healthy + Engaged Play/Outdoor Super Activities for Super Kids

Biking: 6 Practical Tips for Families






Whether you love a leisurely ride or a real off-road adventure, find a type of biking that appeals to your family. Here are 6 practical tips to get kids started with family-friendly biking.

Source: Flickr

By the ActivityHero Team with Guest Amanda Wilks

Kids are often tempted to spend hours of their unstructured play time glued to electronic devices. Instead, why not encourage them to go out for a ride? With many benefits for the body and mind, biking is a healthy outdoor activity that can be done at almost any age. Looking to try it out? Here’s expert advice on sizing, types, gear, classes, and specialized activities like mountain biking.

1. Get Fitted

The most important step is to measure your child’s Inseam. A bicycle inseam (or leg length) is not the same as a clothing inseam.

To measure, grab a book and a tape measurer. The child should stand with her back against a wall, spreading her feet about 6 inches apart, either barefoot or in socks. Place a book between her legs, close to the crotch to mimic the bike seat.

Measure from the top of the book (that is, the spine) down to the floor. Choosing a slightly larger bike is fine in order to leave a little room to grow into. Avoid choosing a size which is too far off the mark for your child, which would impede his ability to learn correct riding habits and even expose him to greater danger.

2. Choose the Right Bike

Depending on your interests, there are three main styles of bike: road, mountain, and “hybrid” (a blend between the two), depending on your interests.

If you’re interested in mountain biking, according to MountainBikeReviewed, you can easily find and buy sturdy bikes for less than $300, like the Mongoose Statis Comp, the Villano Blackjack 2.0 or the Schwinn High Timber. Other great mountain bike brands which are geared towards kids are Spawn, Cleary, Early Rider, Pello and Stampede. Many mountain bikes are, contrary to opinion, quite cost-effective.

For road bikes, your local bike shop should have recommendations. Online retailers like Amazon will often have many customer reviews posted. There are also online outfits like BikeExchange if you prefer doing research online.

No matter what style you go with, when the child stands over the bike, there should be a 1-2 “ space between the crotch and the top bar of the bike. Also, “a beginner should be able to plant both feet flat on the ground when getting off the bike, which ensures safety and helps with confidence,” recommends Nick Pavlakis of Pedalheads, a learn-to-ride bike camp based in Seattle, Portland, Denver and Chicago.

Ideally, the right bike choice should be made based on the wheel size, not the frame size. Use the chart below:

Wheel Size 12″ —> Age 2 -3 —> Height 2’10 – 3’4

Wheel Size 14″ —> Age 3 -4 —> Height 3’1 – 3’7

Wheel Size 16″ —> Age 4-5 —> Height 3’7 – 4’0 

Wheel Size 20’ —> Age 5-8 —> Height 4’0 – 4’5

Wheel Size 24′ —>  Age 8-11 —> Height  4’5 – 4’9 

Wheel Size 26′ —> Age 11+ —> Height 4’9

These are rough approximations and, since every child is unique, you should use these numbers only as a guide.

3. Get Essential Gear

A good helmet which protects the brain is the single most important safety feature you must have. Make sure it fits, covers the entirety of the forehead and is properly ventilated. According to Pavlakis of Pedalheads, “research shows that up to 90% of fatal bicycle crashes result from head trauma,” so using a properly fitted and certified helmet will protect the head and brain from damage, which might save your child’s life. Note that helmets are mandatory for children under the age of 16 in most areas. “Check that there is no more than a two-finger gap between your eyebrows and the front part of the helmet,” advises Pavlakis.

Layer up with season-appropriate clothing. In summer, light clothing with good arm and leg coverage will protect from sun, and in cooler temperatures, don’t forget gloves, warm socks, and a wind-proof shell.

For urban and suburban biking, invest in a solid bicycle lock.

If you want to take the whole family along but have younger children who aren’t yet able to pedal on their own steam, the most common options are: Trailers (a wheeled carriage which attaches in back of a bicycle), Pedal-less Bikes (also called Balance Bikes, where kids push off the ground to move forward), and Trail-a-Bikes (a seat plus single-wheel that attaches to a bicycle, allowing pedaling without steering capabilities).

4. Find Classes or Camps

Classes and camps will generally cover the four basic rules of bike riding:

  • Riding in a straight line without deviating from it;
  • Looking back without losing balance or swerving;
  • Stopping the bike using the brakes, taking into account the surroundings;
  • Good speed control and adapting it in accordance with the terrain.

After mastering these basics, group classes are a great way for kids to learn important skills like giving hand signals, negotiating hilly terrain, understanding road signs and dangers, following traffic flow, and practicing proper spacing between riders.

 Find biking camps and classes near me > >

As a side note, older kids will benefit from learning some everyday maintenance routines, like checking the bike tire’s air pressure, putting the chain back together, and testing the brakes, often covered in more advanced classes or camps.

More inclined to teach on your own? Here’s a helpful guide.  Remember to read up on safety do’s and don’ts. If you get to the stage where a child is nearly ready to remove the training wheels, Pavlakis advises parents to take their time: “Don’t rush the process. Taking the training wheels off too early can become a negative experience for the child and may lead to resistance in learning.”

5. Mountain Biking

Mountain biking is a sport that is growing rapidly in popularity by offering excitement, challenge, and unique outdoor settings. To get kids started with mountain biking, you should remember that at the outset, your child might not have the physical endurance or the attention span needed to finish a certain route. Try increasing trip difficulty and length gradually to make the learning process smoother.

First, make sure your child is very capable and comfortable traversing flat, easy terrain. Then transition to doubletrack dirt trails with varying degrees of difficulty and topography. Plan ahead to reduce the chance of accidents. Initially choose short, fun routes that you know well and that you feel your kid can complete with relative ease. Have fun increasing the level of difficulty over time!

6. Find Focus, Stay Safe

Pavlakis recommends that beginning bikers “maintain focus and awareness at all times,” of the conditions on their road or trail to reinforce safe habits. Biking is a perfect way to leave behind the distractedness of everyday life and be more fully engaged in the present. Have fun!

On a roll? Check updated schedules and reviews of popular biking camps and classes in your area on ActivityHero.

About the author

Amanda Wilks is a writer, veteran MTB rider and sports advocate. Her passion for mountain biking dates back to her childhood, when she would join her dad every weekend for a quick ride uphill. She is now addicted to the sport and she never misses a trail. Learn more about Amanda on Twitter.

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Camps Cooking Parenting Resources

Spring Cooking with Kids






focus shot of kids in cooking class

Looking to put some “spring” into your home cooking routine? We asked the head chef at a kids’ cooking school to share handy tips and a delicious recipe.

By Wendy Chou

Cooking for kids can feel like a thankless task. When kids reject new foods and haven’t got a clue how much effort went into prepping a meal, it’s easy to get frustrated. Now consider cooking with kids. Having your kid help in the kitchen can break down some of their prejudices and teach them to appreciate where real food comes from. ActivityHero talked with Chef Cindy Roberts of the popular Bay Area-based “La Toque De Cindy” cooking school to hear how an expert helps kids learn to cook. 

Cooking is Fun… and Practical

Each of Roberts’ weekly summer camps showcases a different type of cooking: chocolate, world cuisine, and handmade pizzas and pastas are just some of the tempting offerings this year. She likes to emphasize the joy and creativity inherent in cooking. Cindy Roberts started cooking at the age of 3 and believes cooking can inspire as well as educate. “I focus on the “fun” aspect of cooking,” Roberts points out, “but it’s my sneaky way to teach them the health, cost and taste benefits of home cooking.” 

Getting Kids to Try New Things

Roberts knows one way parents can broaden the palette of picky eaters: give them a say. “Have them taste test something… and suggest improvements,” advises Roberts. In her cooking classes, asking the kids to experiment directly with ingredients “gets even the most finicky eaters trying out what we made and giving it a second chance.” In other words, the more they know about how a dish is put together, the more they can keep an open mind, even about foods they weren’t keen on at the outset.

> > Find cooking camps and classes near me   

Amazed by Their Own Potential

When asked what the kids in her classes find most surprising about cooking, Roberts says that young chefs are completely “surprised at how easy it is to make some of the products they buy packaged at the grocery store,” including basics like chicken stock and mayonnaise. The homemade versions wind up being fresher and better-tasting. Empowerment and self-confidence: these two ingredients are welcome on any family menu.

Try It at Home

Here’s a savory spring-inspired recipe for you to try at home with your kids. The kid chefs at La Toque loved it (and ate their vegetables)!  

Photo by Flickr user Lollyknit

Leek and Olive Tart

  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 40 minutes
  • Serves 6-8
  • Adapted by Cindy Roberts from Field of Greens cookbook

Ingredients

TART DOUGH 

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 2/3 teaspoons salt
  • 4 tablespoons cold butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 ½ tablespoons vegetable shortening
  • 2 ½ – 3 tablespoons cold water

FILLING

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 medium sized leeks, white part only, cut in half then thinly sliced
  • salt and pepper
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 8 small whole olives, pitted and chopped
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped Italian parsley
  • 3 or 4 eggs (use fewer if using jumbo eggs)
  • 1 ½ cup half and half
  • ½ teaspoon minced lemon zest (optional)
  • 2 ounces grated Parmesan cheese, about 2/3 cup

Instructions

  1. MAKE THE SHELL: Mix flour, salt, butter and shortening until mixture has the appearance of small peas.
  2. Add water a little at a time until dough holds together.  Press into greased quiche pan (or pie pan).
  3. MAKE THE FILLING: Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan.  Saute the leeks for a few minutes until starting to wilt with ½ teaspoon salt and a few pinches of pepper.  Add the garlic, cover and sweat for about 7 minutes. Remove the lid and sauté 2 minutes more.
  4. Mix leeks in a bowl with olives, thyme and parsley.
  5. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
  6. Beat the eggs with the half and half.  Add ½ teaspoon salt, a pinch of pepper and optional lemon zest.
  7. Spread the cheese over the bottom of the tart dough, followed by the leek mixture.  Pour the cream mixture over. Bake for 40 minutes until set.

Chef Cindy’s Tip:

The amount of participation is easy to modify depending on age. “Kids as young as 4 could assemble. At age 8, kids could make the crust themselves. By age 10 they could make it all on their own!”  

Ready to explore more cooking? Find cooking camps and classes near you by visiting ActivityHero.com.  

 

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Drawing and Painting Gardening Hiking

8 Spring Activities for Preschoolers






Need something new to do with your little ones as the weather warms up? Welcome spring together with these creative and sensory outdoor activities.

By Skyanne Fisher

After a long winter, preschoolers will perk up when you introduce them to new spring activities. Head outside in the sunshine, and celebrate the arrival of spring!

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Make Your Own Sidewalk Chalk

Sidewalk chalk was a childhood favorite of mine, and it seems to be a timeless pastime, as every child I know loves it. Instead of just grabbing a box of chalk at the local store, create a new family memory by making your own.

To create chalk: Cut a paper towel tube into 3- or 5-inch pieces, and use waxed paper to line the inside and cover one of the ends. (Hold the paper it in place with masking tape.) Mix 2 to 3 tablespoons of tempera paint, ¾ cup of plaster of Paris, and ½ cup of water. Pour the mixture inside the tubes and let sit for a few hours, until solidified. Peel off the waxed paper and cardboard tube, and you have your own homemade chalk for hours of decorating your sidewalk.


toddler finger paintingDabble in Finger Paints

I’ve yet to meet a child who doesn’t love finger painting, and rarely do I meet a child who doesn’t “accidentally” get a little paint in their mouth. Most finger paints are labeled “nontoxic,” but I still like to make my own paint because I know exactly what is in it. Plus, helping you make the paint can be a fun activity for a child.

To make finger paint: Use a ratio of 1 part flour to 2 parts water. For one child and a few colors, I typically start with ½ cup of flour and 1 cup of cold water. Combine the ingredients in a saucepan and heat it on the stove, stirring until it becomes a smooth mixture and the lumps are gone. Then remove the flour mixture from the heat and divide it into bowls, one for each color you’d like to make. Slowly add cold water until the paint is at the desired consistency, and stir in food coloring. Add a pinch of salt, which helps to stop the paint from spoiling, and you can store it in the fridge indefinitely.

Whip Up Some Homemade Bubble Mix

Bubbles are another springtime favorite. While it’s easy to run to the store to grab a bottle of bubbles, making your own is super easy. And witnessing a child’s excitement when they see the bubbles they’ve made themselves is far better than grabbing a bottle at the store. However, I do recommend picking up some bubble wands to get the most fun out of this activity.

To make bubbles: Combine 12 cups of water, 1 cup of dish soap, 1 cup of cornstarch, and 2 tablespoons of baking powder. You can also add 1 tablespoon of glycerin, but the recipe works fine without it. Combine all ingredients, taking care not to create bubbles as you stir. Let sit for 1 hour, then enjoy an afternoon of bubble fun!

OutdoorPlay-300x226Go on a Scavenger Hunt

Take a walk with your child and enjoy all that nature has to offer. Head through your neighborhood to the local park or, if you’re lucky enough to have access, walk along a creek bed. Encourage your child to explore and search for butterflies, salamanders, worms, frogs, birds, and other small animals. Ask them to count how many different types of flowers they see. Seeing nature “waking up” is the perfect introduction to spring.

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Fill Up a Spring-Themed Sensory Bin

Sensory bins are a great thing to have around throughout the year. Essentially they are plastic bins, boxes, or similar containers filled with objects of various sizes, shapes, and textures. They are perfect for toddlers and preschoolers who are fascinated simply by the way things feel, and they are a great way to introduce children to new things. Sensory bins are particularly helpful during rainy days when the kids can’t get outside to play.

To create a spring sensory bin: Fill a plastic bin about halfway with dirt, sand, or pebbles. Then add things like flowers from the yard, miniature flower pots, kid-safe indoor gardening tools, plastic bugs or worms, and any other fun additions that you find around the house.

Craft a Few Bird Feeders

Making bird feeders each spring was a favorite tradition of mine and something I love doing with my children. All you need is a toilet paper roll and some peanut butter, birdseed, and string.

To create a bird feeder: First, put the string through the center of the toilet paper roll and leave at least 6 inches of string on either side of the roll before tying the ends together in a knot. This is how you will hang the feeder in a tree. Next, cover the outside of the toilet paper roll with peanut butter and roll it in birdseed. Make sure to cover the entire surface. Head out to your yard, select a tree, and hang it up. It’s fun to choose a tree that’s visible from the house so you and your kids can watch as the birds come to eat.

Mix Up Some Spring Goo

“Goo” is another great sensory activity — especially since this fun substance acts like a liquid and a solid.

To create Spring Goo: Mix 1 part water with 2 parts cornstarch. Stir in flowers, glitter, or anything else you think might be a good addition. Goo can also be turned into a fun science experiment: It’s a solid when cupped in your hands or resting in a bowl, but it behaves like a liquid when you pour it from your hand.

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toddler in the gardenSpend Time in the Garden

Spring is planting season. Why not allow your child the chance to have his or her own kid-size garden? If you already have a garden, dedicate a small corner to your child. If not, choose a sunny spot and create a new garden bed together. Allow your child to choose the seeds, help plant them, and then tend the garden as one of their daily responsibilities. It’s an educational experience that also gives children an opportunity to connect with nature … while getting a little dirty!

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Academics Creative Writing Reading

Best Books to Get Your Middle Schooler Interested in Reading






If your middle schooler hasn’t fallen in love with reading, take a look at this list of books. From fantasy to nonfiction to movie stories and more …

Blog Best Books 2

Getting your child to read can be a matter of simply putting engaging material in front of them. My personal strategy is to pre-read books with my son’s taste in mind, then put only the best books in front of him. Not only does this ensure my tween has compelling (and appropriate) reading material, but it also gives us plenty of things to talk about around the dinner table. Consider trying out lit in many forms — graphic novels, Kindle books and good old fashioned paperbacks.

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Here’s an intriguing roundup of everything from end-of-the-world tales to mysteries to nonfiction. You just might find a title that will entice your middle school child to start turning pages (whether paper or electronic) immediately!

Dystopian or Post-Apocalyptic Books for Middle Schoolers

Dystopian literature is a popular Young Adult genre that is typified by a society unlike our own with unsettling or unpleasant living conditions that must be overcome. Post-apocalyptic novels are set in a period after a world-changing cataclysm. Here are a few in this category to consider if your tween likes games and TV shows that are a little darker.

Matched by Ally Condie

In a world rigidly controlled by the “Society,” young people at age 17 are matched (by the powers that be) to their life partner. Cassia is matched with her best friend, Xander, but sees that an outcast named Ky was a discarded possibility. This sends her on a journey to question the choices made for them and how little control they have over their futures. It’s the first in a three-book series that Disney purchased for future film production.

The Maze Runner by James Dashner

Teen Thomas wakes in a service elevator being lifted into a harsh world populated only by other boys his age. They have to survive within a courtyard surrounded by a maze with walls 50 feet high and dodge the monsters that lurk in it. When they don’t progress fast enough, the stakes get higher. This has been made into a hit movie and is the first of a trilogy, so there’s plenty of reading available.

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

The setting: an alternate world where everyone grows up looking average until they get mandatory life-changing cosmetic surgery when they reach age 16. But physical perfection comes at a mind-numbing cost. A band of rebels fights against the ruling overlords to be who they are no matter how they look. This is a great book for pre-pubescent kids already feeling the pressure to look a certain way. It’s the first in a series of four novels.

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Science Fiction Books for Middle Schoolers

This isn’t your mother or father’s sci-fi. Today’s futuristic YA novels are more complex and look beyond simple travel to (or life on) another planet. Or they look to the future of our own Earth, where new technologies craft our societies and how we live. If your tween is all about high-tech stuff and enjoys movies like Ender’s Game, this is a category of fiction that encourages them to explore their imaginations.

Michael Vey: The Prisoner of Cell 25 by Richard Paul Evans

Michael and a group of teens were born in a hospital while a new medical devices were being tested — and now they all have superpowers. Vey can manipulate electricity. He has Tourette’s and is being raised by a single mom while on the run from the corporation trying to collect the kids. He makes friends with more super kids and they confront the evil Dr Hatch. Four books have been released of this gripping seven-novel series.

Lockdown by Alexander Gordon Smith

The sci-fi Escape from Furnace series borders on horror and is perfect for tweens who dig The Walking Dead and Attack on Titan. In the distant future, Furnace Penitentiary, a fictional highly secure London prison for troubled teens, is buried a mile beneath the earth and is guarded by creatures in gas masks and deformed howling beasts. Chills ensue as the teens try to escape unjust sentences and monsters.

Feed by MT Anderson

This science fiction novel falls under the new class of cyberpunk. Set in the near future, people have brain implants called a “feed” that is a pipeline to an advanced and aggressive Internet. Corporate ads, social media, and online chats consume the brain while corporations run America. Teens enjoying Spring Break on the moon begin to question the system and try to break free of the feed.

Blog Best Books 1

Fantasy Books for Middle Schoolers

For tweens who have an interest in supernatural shows and movies, YA fantasy covers a wide swath of subjects. From vampires to werewolves, fairies to witches, angels to ghosts, there is a wide array of books and authors to choose from — and best of all, many come in a series that will keep them reading.

The Mortal Instruments by Cassandra Clare

Set in New York City, this series starts with City of Bones. It’s considered urban fantasy and involves a set of young teens. Demons have invaded the world, and part-angel part-human Nephilim, called Shadowhunters, hunt them down and protect the world. Fifteen-year-old Clary doesn’t know she’s a Shadowhunter, but soon finds out and discovers her world has werewolves and vampires as well. It is a gripping series.

The Secret Watchers by Lauren Klever

A rare YA fantasy with a male protagonist, this series starts with Visions where 14-year-old Owen Ryer visits a pawn shop and happens upon an old watch that unlocks a gift to sense dark energy and evil. Now he has to figure out how to support the greater good while dealing with homework, bullies, and other challenges that high schoolers face. Owen is an unintentional hero that will inspire your teen reader.

Echo’s Revenge by Sean Austin

Everyone likes a good video game, and 14-year-old Reggie draws the admiration of fellow teen gamer Claire. A new game monster ECHO-7 is released into the real world by game developers, and this fantastical creature is now going after the top gamers and taking them out. Reggie has to learn to apply his online gaming skills into real-world adventures to keep his fellow gamers safe. Great for gamers that hate to read!

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Movie Adaptation Books for Middle Schoolers

This may be one of the easiest ways to lure your tween into reading: Get them to investigate their favorite movie in book form. While a number of the above have been adapted into movies, most of those listed below became popular after they hit the big screen. Leverage your kids’ interest in the characters to get them reading.

Hunger Games Series by Suzanne Collins

If your tween ever wondered exactly how Katniss came to be so good with that bow, the trilogy of books offers lot more back-story on her (and Peeta’s and Gale’s) childhood in District 12. There’s a lot more story than even four movies can show, and these books are great reads.

Divergent Series by Veronica Roth

The Divergent movie didn’t have enough screen time to truly explore the strange and dangerous world Tris grew up in, the books do so quite nicely. And once your tween hits the halfway point of book two, they will be shocked to find out the real story of how Chicago came to be the land of factions and what waits beyond Amity and that imposing fence. This is one you may enjoy reading along with them!

Percy Jackson Series by Rick Riordan

The Percy Jackson movies were fun, but the books may help your tween pick up knowledge to ace a class on mythology. There’s enough story there to keep them reading all summer long. Riordan wrote seven primary novels about Jackson and his pals, plus five supplementary books and three graphic novels. The cast of characters suits male and female readers alike.

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Mysteries for Middle Schoolers

If your tween is a fan of the shows Sherlock and Elementary or could never stop solving Blue’s Clues as a toddler, mystery may be a great genre to unveil for them. Some of these mysteries are whodunits where crime takes a darker and more lethal turn, while other books involve less deadly crimes. A good mystery can be quite the page-turner to keep your tween reading and engaged.

Heist Society Series by Ally Carter

This one is fun because the female heroine is both criminal and crime solver. Katarina was raised in a family of highly skilled cat burglars, but then she chooses to leave the family business. When her dad is suspected of stealing a painting from a dangerous mobster, his life is on the line. Katarina and her crew of teen accomplices must find the painting to save her dad. There are three novels and counting.

Young Sherlock Holmes Series by Andrew Lane

Picture Sherlock as a teen in Victorian England solving crimes as a young rogue. The series begins with 14-year-old Holmes investigating mysterious deaths. The second installment has him investigating whether John Wilkes Booth is alive and well in England. Intrigue and adventure accompany the teen prodigy as he develops his investigative skills across the UK, Russia and even China.

Echo Falls Mystery series by Peter Abrahams

A YA series by a best-selling writer of crime novels for adults, these books are genuinely thrilling and perfect for tweens. Ingrid is a busy girl and a big fan of mysteries, but when her shoes are left at a murder scene, she has to retrieve them without implicating herself. Ingrid must solve the murder of the town’s resident loon while sorting out the strange undercurrents she never noticed in her small town. You may want to read it too.

Nonfiction Books for Middle Schoolers

Not every kid digs fiction, and that’s okay. There are a ton of great reads on the nonfiction shelves, from biographies to how-to’s to historical accounts of great events. This is a genre to experiment with, so explore your local library’s generous nonfiction section. Below are a few suggestions to get you thinking about what true-life things your tween may like.

We Should Hang Out Sometime by Josh Sundquist

This memoir by a Paralympian who lost a leg at age 9 to Ewing’s Sarcoma is surprisingly hilarious. He’s been unlucky in love since middle school and goes back to talk to each of his former girlfriends to find out why he’s so clueless and where he went wrong. In addition to being a compelling coming-of-age story, this book explores Josh’s cancer struggle, what it’s like to have lost a limb, and how he found the courage to compete as a Paralympian.

Chasing Lincoln’s Killer by James L Swanson

This slice of American history vividly describes the race to capture John Wilkes Booth. Swanson used rare manuscripts, as well as interviews with those who pursued Booth, to explore the 12-day manhunt that ran from the Ford Theater in Washington, D.C., across Maryland and into Virginia before they caught Lincoln’s assassin. Your tween will impress their Social Studies teacher with knowledge gleaned from this book.

I Have Lived a Thousand Years: Growing Up in the Holocaust by Livia Bitton-Jackson

This is a survivor’s account of life in a concentration camp. The author was 13 when her family was sent by Nazis to the Jewish ghetto and then to Auschwitz. She details living at the camp, wearing the yellow star, and being forced into labor, as well as how her experience strengthened her faith. Bitton-Jackson’s survival tale is moving and poignant, and it brings to life this terrible and important chapter of history.

books-for-middle-school-children

Whether reading entertaining novels, visiting museums or attending academics-focused summer camps, make sure your tween makes the most of summer by keeping their brain active!

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Those of you located in the Bay Area should look into Journey Across Time’s Marco Polo Camp in Palo Alto. Children are taken on a 10-week journey through time as they read and learn about art, culture, languages, and history through a unique, hands-on, role-playing summer camp experience for kids ages 8 to 13. Storytelling and role-playing historic events are a great way to immerse your children in reading historical literature, while also keeping them entertained all summer long!

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Lego

Everything is Awesome: Lego Activities






indoor kids activities obstacle courseIf you have a Lego lover, or even if you don’t, you can have some fun and creative activities with these everlasting bricks. These Lego activity ideas require minimal prep time and as long as you have Legos (or Duplos for the younger crowd) somewhere in your house, you are already halfway prepared. I pull out these ideas when my son is looking for something to do on a snow day or when I need a few minutes of quiet to take a deep breath or read a few chapters of my library book.

While these activities work great for kiddos alone, they really start to break the imagination barrier when you get the kids working in groups. You can try a few of these out for your next play date, Scout meeting, or even a Lego themed birthday party. Compete in teams or work in groups and then share the creations. No matter how you use these activities, you are sure to find some meaningful (and educational) time together. Let’s get started!

Problem Solving Situations
Lego 1
This one is my preschooler’s favorite and I love that it works his imagination and critical thinking. Before your group arrives (or while they are having a snack or playing in the other room), set up Lego figures in situations that require intervention. For example, figures trying to cross a shark infested river (like the photo), figures trying to climb a bookcase to retrieve a treasure, or figures trying to open a drawer. It doesn’t have to be a major production, so don’t worry if you can’t come up with a major storyline and situation. Instead, you are just giving your group the starting point.

Lego 2Let the kids know that they can create anything with their Legos to help the figures solve their problem. You’ll be surprised and impressed when you see them create creations from ladders to spaceships to help their figures solve the problem. Once they have created, give them time to talk about their ideas with the rest of the group.

Color Puzzles

The great thing about Legos is that you don’t need a lot of direction to get kids thinking differently or creatively. Try out a color puzzle with your group and see how they use the colors to make a new creation.

Lego 3Simply grab some crayons (make sure you only use colors that match your Lego stash) and make a pattern on a piece of paper. Then, ask your group to use the Legos to create something that matches the color instructions. They might have lots of questions at first, but simply let them build whatever they want. It just has to match the color puzzle that you laid out for them.

Lego Races

Pre-build a few creations to put at the end of the room. Tuck the pre-built creation into a shoebox so that it is not visible from anywhere else in the room. At the other side of the room, or the starting line, put a pile of Legos that includes pieces and colors that match the shoebox creations. Group children into teams, and let them know that their objective is to work together to build the project that is completed at the other side of the room. When you start the race, each child runs to the end of the room to look at the creation and comes back to the start line to start to create the finished product that he just saw. Once he places a few pieces, it is the next child’s turn to run down, take a look, and return to build on what they have started. Continue with this until the team thinks that they have built the exact replica of item in the shoebox.

When they think that they have it, I like to have them yell something silly like “Legopalooza” or “Happy birthday Johnny!”. Once they yell that they have it, you can inspect their creation. If it matches, they win and if it doesn’t match, they have to keep racing to figure it out.

Depending on the age and skill of your group, you can make the shoebox creations easy or more difficult to replicate. It is fun to watch the kids form a strategy and then adapt that course of action as the race continues. I love Lego races because it gives the brain and the body a good workout.

Start with a Book

indoor kids activities obstacle courseI’m always looking for ways to incorporate books into our home activities. I am an avid reader and, so far, so is my son. I think that the more we can get good literature into our day, the better and more imaginative our day is.

For this activity, you only need a good read-aloud book and a pile of Legos. Read the book to your group and then have them build something (individually or in groups) that is inspired by the book. Try not to give them ideas or any further direction and just watch where their imagination leads them. After they build, give them a chance to explain their creation to the group and how the book inspired it. Not only is this activity excellent for imagination, it is also great for comprehension, which is a major reading readiness skill.

These are just a few ways that you can breathe some life into your Lego activity sets. If you have Lego lovers that still can’t get enough, you might want to check out these awesome Lego Camps or Classes!

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Lego

Kidizens Summer Camps: Leveraging the Love of LEGOs to Learn Civic Responsibility and Leadership






ActivityHero spoke with Prerana Vadiya, the CEO of Kidizens to learn more about their unique program.

How do LEGOs and being a mayor go together?  

At Kidizens’ Summer Camps, children (grades K-3 and 3-6) learn all about the civics and economics of managing and governing a city!  In a one or two week intensive, action-packed session, children partner up to create and run their own small civilization from TONS of LEGOs. As mayors, our campers have LOTS of responsibility and opportunities for leadership –they’ll be providing residents of their cities with EVERYTHING they need to stay safe, healthy, and happy! At the same time, the mayors will be managing natural disasters, solving everyday problems, dealing with budgetary crises, holding inter-city summits to work with neighboring cities, and handling animated court cases!

Our Kidizens team will present real-life lessons and necessary information on all topics and create newer challenges as well as opportunities for problem solving!

 

Do you have kids returning each year?

Kidizens’ Summer Camps have built upon the successes of previous camps and its established year long civics and real life social studies programs. Our summer camps have received tremendous parent endorsements and have become increasingly popular: many kids have returned for a second and third year. All the summer camps are run by experienced teachers and supported by dedicated volunteers.

Kidizens Summer Camps offered for grades K – 6 in Los Altos, Saratoga and Belmont, CA.

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After-School Activities Parenting Resources Super Activities for Super Kids

What Are the Best Summer Camps for Your Child’s Personality?






Any parent can tell you that all kids are truly one-of-a-kind. So how does a parent go about picking the right summer camps for their unique child?

Not all little girls want to be ballerinas at dance camp, and all boys are not fit to be a star at sports camp. Not only do different activities help keep kids active and healthy; they also help build self-confidence, creativity, and are a great form of stress relief.

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Step 1: Ask for their input

Perhaps your daughter has caught the fever for archery after seeing Katniss and Princess Merida in action, or the last season of The Voice has your son belting out tunes that beg for voice lessons. While parents have the final say in what activities kids will pursue, keep in mind that all kids should be allowed to have their own personal goals and preferences.

Step 2: Assess their personality

Another way to help choose summer camps for your kids is to take cues from their personality traits. For instance, a child who longs to explore might not find foreign language camps as exciting as an outdoor adventure camp. Here’s a few recommendations on how to find the perfect summer camps for your child:

How to find a summer camp

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Encourage your kids to explore and check out all of the different camps and classes in your area on ActivityHero!

Written by Sarah Antrim