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3 Back to School Pain Points with Solutions

(Pandemic Edition)

As we all continue to adjust to an ever-evolving new normal, surviving a back to school season in the time of a pandemic, remains challenging.

From experiencing unexpected school quarantines (e.g. a student in your kid’s class tests positive for COVID-19) to being waitlisted for after school extended care and all the driving around for drop-offs and pickups, here’s how three moms at ActivityHero are managing the chaos.

1. Hacking (Unexpected) School Closures

Meet Kathrine: Mom to a Kindergartener (Los Angeles)

We were so excited to go in-person to the ‘big’ school this year. Just a few days in, school communicated that a child in my Kindergartener’s class tested positive for COVID-19, so the classroom was going to shut down for 10 days. My daughter was sent home with a computer for virtual instruction along with packets of information and materials for next two week’s instruction.

Solution: Register for last-minute online camps with classmates to squeeze in some virtual play dates.  

Distance learning was scheduled for 9-11 am daily. With half the day still remaining, we found online classes to help with the afternoon so she wasn’t parked in front of the TV for all of that time. She really enjoys Minecraft and Roblox so finding social clubs or easy 45~min classes to support her favorite interests was easy. To help support some physical activity, we did also add an online Ballet class.

2. Mind the After School Gap

Meet Tabetha: Mom to a 3rd Grader (San Francisco)

After months of distance and hybrid learning, having school for a 6 hour block of time has been an amazing improvement. We were hopeful at first, then officially waitlisted for after school extended care to get us through to 6pm. As a household with two full-time working parents the 3pm pickup is challenging. With the luxury of school facilitated enrichment programs like Chess and Basketball (and this coveted time for when homework could be done with an on-site tutor) missing this year, panic-mode started to settle in. And then we chatted with some of my son’s friends and realized we could do online classes.

Solution: Find online extracurriculars for your kids so you can attend a meeting and make dinner. It’s a win, win situation for everyone.

Fun classes where learning looks like play is our usual approach for extracurricular activities so our son’s hobbies helped with the selection process. LEGO and Pokemon are his current favorites. Even better, the themed classes we found are actually great for problem solving, building and creativity. Dancing to burn off energy is also a must. Different than last year, only having a small window of online classes has been much more manageable. 

3. Less Driving = More Learning

Meet Kristen: Mom to a 7th Grader & 11th Grader (Sacramento)

We couldn’t wait for in-person school to start this year. For my 7th grader, this meant going to a new school. With two kids at two different schools and two different sets of activities, we didn’t realize all the added back and forth driving until it was happening. 
Beyond the everyday drive to and from school, I now have to make a 3rd and 4th trip, 4 days a week for sports. This is in addition to the same daily drop off to and from school at a separate campus and several evening practices for club sports at least an hour each way. Today, we spent over 4 hours in the car driving back and forth and didn’t get home until after 9pm. The boys had to do their homework in the car and I won’t even mention what they had for dinner.

Solution: Fuel kids’ brains with fun online classes to minimize time spent in the car.

We never thought we’d say this, but we were missing online classes and virtual sports. (We saved so much time and gas last year!) To help offset the in-person activities, we decided to go back and add online classes into our weekend schedule. Online Drawing and Art classes have become our time together to connect as a family. The kids are also now signed up for virtual Martial Arts and Coding classes. All of which can happen in the comfort of our home.  

Find your back to school solution! Create an account and profile for your kid to find even more personalized classes and camps at ActivityHero.

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4 Ways to Prevent the Summer Slide

Here are some simple tips to help your kids from experiencing brain drain during summer break.

Summer vacation is traditionally known as a time for kids to pause academic studies and just have fun. So while taking a break is important, preventing the Summer Slide is also a priority worth considering. In 1996, the first studies of the Summer Slide showed us that kids lose large amounts of knowledge in reading and math over summer break, which can contribute to an escalation of future skills lost.

Younger kids are more at-risk of experiencing learning loss. “In general, kids learn a lot more in kindergarten, first grade, and second grade than kids in middle school or high school, because learning follows a curve where it’s accelerated early in life and then plateaus,” says James Kim, Ed.D., an assistant professor of education at Harvard University.1

Summer Learning Loss Facts2

  • 1 month (equivalent) of overall learning is lost after summer vacation
  • 3 months of math skills + 2 months of reading are lost over the summer
  • 6 weeks is spent re-learning old material in the fall to make up for summer learning loss

Yes, these numbers sound scary, but don’t worry! Being informed is the first step and knowing that we’ve got you covered with solutions is the other key part of this process. This summer, keep your kids engaged with these teacher-approved brain-building activities.

Read

60% of kids ages 6 to 17 say they love or like reading books for fun a lot.1 Kids gain more from reading when they actually enjoy it. Let them choose. 

Play

“Learning through play is about continuity; bringing together children’s spheres of life – home, school, and the wider world, and doing so over time.” Susan MacKay, Director of Teaching and Learning at Portland Children’s Museum.3 Kids’ math and vocabulary skills extend beyond worksheets and can be found in hobbies related to board games, S.T.E.A.M., sharing stories, and more.

Imagine

Paul Harris, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education who studies imagination. “The imagination is absolutely vital for contemplating reality, not just those things we take to be mere fantasy.”4 Through imagination, kids expand their cognitive abilities to think, know, remember and experiment with new concepts. Even though it may not seem like it, they are learning! Familiar skills are being used to develop new ones.

Explore

Through exploration, curiosity is encouraged. With that, more experiences and interests for your kids emerge. Studies show that exploration also supports social-emotional development by allowing kids to build confidence for both independent and collaborative interactions with others. Try something new today. 

Create an account and profile for your kid to find even more personalized camps and classes at ActivityHero.

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10 Amazing Discounts for ActivityHero Families in LA

Did you know that you can access MemberDeals discounts to your favorite amusement parks, zoos, and other popular destinations as a free benefit of being part of the ActivityHero community?

Find great, money-saving deals at you and your kids’ favorite outdoor locations across Southern California for now and all year long.

  1. Six Flags Magic Mountain

This “Thrill Capital of the World” features over 100 rides and attractions that will satisfy the whole family! Within this 260-acre theme park, Six Flags contains 19 thrilling and exhilarating roller coasters that your kids will greatly enjoy. From smaller toddlers to thrill-seeking teenagers, Six Flags offers a number of rides to everyone’s liking. (See discounted price.)

  1. Disneyland

At the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, your kids can enjoy the characters and environments from their favorite childhood stories. They can meet their favorite princesses and villains, go on adventures with the stars of their most-watched movies, and explore fascinating attractions like “It’s a Small World” and “Pirates of the Caribbean”. Children of all ages will be entertained at the “Happiest Place on Earth!” (See discounted price.)

  1. Los Angeles Dodgers

With tickets to watch the splendid Los Angeles Dodgers, your kids can cheer for their favorite team in an exciting and electrifying atmosphere! Fans of all ages can enjoy the perks at this magnificent Dodger Stadium that features great outdoors seating and delicious food to enjoy during the game. This spirited venue brings people to their feet and gives them gripping games and exhilarating plays. (See discounted price.)

  1. Los Angeles Angels

At the Angel Stadium of Anaheim, fans can enjoy thrilling games, delicious concessions, and great merchandise from their favorite team! This exhilarating game is a great experience for fans of all ages as they get a chance to make wonderful memories with their family. The modern Angel Stadium has splendid outdoor seating where your kids can watch the game they love in an exciting environment. (See discounted price.)

  1. Aquarium of the Pacific

At the Aquarium of the Pacific, get a chance to view the wonders of the largest ocean in the world. With over 100 exhibits, you and your family can explore the fascinating underwater world with the animals and creatures you love! Featured exhibitions include the June Keyes Penguin Habitat, the Shark Lagoon, the Lorikeet Forest, and more. (See discounted price.)

  1. Six Flags Hurricane Harbor

This exciting water park is the perfect place for adventure-loving kids! Six Flags Hurricane Harbor features exciting and heart-pumping water slides for your thrill-seeking kids and calmer lazy rivers and family-friendly rides for you and your toddlers. Kids of all ages can enjoy the several rides here as well as the delicious food while making wonderful memories with their family. (See discounted price.)

  1. Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens

Discover over 1,400 animals at the immersive and lush habitats at the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens! Your kids can learn about the fascinating wonders of wildlife by visiting the wide variety of animals at this zoo. Los Angeles Zoo also features exhibits like Elephants of Asia, Rainforest of the Americas, and the Lair. (See discounted price.)

  1. Knott’s Berry Farm

This small family farm has now grown into a world famous theme park and is the perfect place to visit with your family! With several rides and attractions, everyone can find an activity for them at Knott’s Berry Farm. From water rides and thrilling roller coasters to family-friendly activities, Knott’s Berry Farm has something for every member of your family. (See discounted price.)

  1. Urban Adventure Quest: Los Angeles

This scavenger hunt that takes you through LA is perfect for puzzle and adventure-loving families! Starting at the Los Angeles Public Library, this adventure helps you discover and learn about the historic downtown Los Angeles. This walking tour of the city is a great way to experience the outdoor life of LA! (See discounted price.)

  1. Warner Bros Studio Tour

Warner Bros. Studio Tour Hollywood gets you closer to the entertainment you love. The Studio Tour gives guests a revealing look behind the camera at how Hollywood magic is made. From Friends to Harry Potter and Wonder Woman, fans get to see the real sets and soundstages where the greatest names in entertainment made history as they touch, tour and explore the iconic 110-acre studio. (See discounted price.)

Explore more locations and deals outside of Southern California!

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Academic Writing Creative Writing

Tips and Resources for Young Writers at Any Age

ActivityHero shares the insights of writing professionals who work with kindergarteners through high schoolers. With these tips, parents can help support kids’ writing goals.

By Wendy Chou

Writing is a key life skill that engages and empowers kids–and is highly correlated with overall academic success. ActivityHero talked with professionals from two writing programs to learn their favorite tips. We also list online resources that will appeal to today’s tech-savvy kids, ‘tweens, and teens.

Tips for Elementary School Writers (Age 6-8) 

1. Have some fun

Darrell Dela Cruz, of Cupertino’s Communication Academy, recommends playing word-centered games to boost knowledge of words and definitions. Some examples are Mad Libs, Boggle, Scrabble, and Bananagrams.

2. Be a role model

Remind kids that writing matters in daily life. Adventures In Writing (AIW) Camp co-founder Jen Hartvickson tells parents: “Write lists, write thank you notes, write letters. When they see you writing, they will do what you do!” 

3. Check out these resources for elementary school writers

  • Storybird is an online forum that allows kids to create and share their own books or to read from the free online library.
  • Three Good Things – A Happiness Journal is a free app promoting a simple and positive message.
  • Krakeln is a friendly vocabulary-building app suitable for even young users.
  • Orange Street News  is a newspaper created by Hilde Lysiak (with her dad’s assistance) when she was just 7 years old and is the inspiration for her own book series.

Tips for Tweens (age 9-12)

1. Practice, practice, practice.

All the experts we consulted agreed that practice leads to writing improvement. Journaling and writing to pen pals can encourage regular writing habits. Jen Hartvickson also finds that tweens are more motivated when given free rein to choose their own topic.

2. Read widely, then discuss.  

AIW Camp Co-founder Hans Hartvickson sees value in parents and kids reading books together, then talking about “what worked” for them and why.

3. Try a song.

Hans Hartvickson suggests songs help teach writing traits and are fun too. AIW Camp has published many songs on YouTube.

> > Find writing camps & classes near you

4. Check out these resources for tweens

  • Stone Soup Magazine is a high-quality literary publication (in print and online) by and for kids.  
  • Youngzine presents current events for a school-aged audience and accepts kids’ submissions of articles and book reviews.
  • KidPub.com has featured kids’ works since 1995 (requires small fee to publish).
  • Brainstorm great reads with blogs like Brightly which lists dozens of titles sorted by age and genre.

Tips for Teens (age 13+)

1. Experiment with styles.

Take chances and try out new styles and content. Teens are starting to develop their unique voice.

2. The more practice, the better!

Consider entering contests at libraries and at school. Don’t stop there: find open mic events and poetry slams. Teens may enjoy blogging about a particular hobby and developing an audience. Many sites host blogs for free. 

3. Find online networking sites devoted to teens

Online writing communities allow teens to network and seek advice from other writers. Here are 4 recommendations:

  • Underlined is a teen-centered website that provides opportunities for collaboration and feedback.
  • Wattpad is the largest and most visible online reading and writing platform, giving it the nickname of “YouTube of writing”.
    Teen Ink hosts writing submissions by teens, including essays, articles, fiction and poetry. Teens can also contribute their art and photography.
  • Power Poetry is the largest online community for teens interested in poetry.

Final words of advice: Lighten Up!

According to Dela Cruz, parents shouldn’t make writing feel like a chore or something with a clearly defined “right or wrong answer”. The Hartvicksons believe kids need reassurance that mistakes and editing are to be expected along the way. Most of all, our experts all agreed that parents should provide fair and constructive feedback to kids. A “Goldilocks” balance means avoiding unrealistic over-praising, while also refraining from giving only negative comments, which can be demoralizing for kids. 

> > Find writing camps & classes near you

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17 Movies, Books & More About School






Whatever their thoughts on school, kids identify with these books, movies, apps, and TV shows about students learning life lessons in the classroom.

By the Kids’ Media Experts at SmartFeed

Education has long been a popular setting in mainstream media, both for inspiration and for entertainment. It has introduced us to famous teachers (Mr. Kotter, Mrs. Frizzle), famous schools (Ridgemont High, Rushmore, Wayside School, Hogwarts), and famous school-centric stories and shows (Wonder, South Park, Saved by the Bell). In each case, we watch with excitement, empathy, or humor, based on our own set of school experiences. And sometimes we get to relish the experience of seeing school (and the learning process) in a whole new light.

See a list of academic classes near you > >

Find a tutor > >

Here, we have gathered a list of titles for families who want some academic role models or lessons for their children, as well as a couple selections that simply offer a little scholastic comic relief. Reflecting a broad mix of real-life and fictional stories, the listings here prove that there are many different ways to learn and many different ways to teach.

Great Books with a Schoolroom Setting

The Year of Miss Agnes book coverThe Year of Miss Agnes
Ages 6+
Schoolteachers don’t usually last very long at this one-room schoolhouse in Alaska. Miss Agnes is different. Not only does she stick around for a year, she also makes learning relatable and enjoyable to the citizens of the remote village.

 

 

Frindle Book CoverFrindle
Ages 8+
Adventures in vocabulary are in play in this story. A boy creates a new word for an ordinary object, and his creation catches on, much to the chagrin of his teacher and parents!

 

 

princess-academy-coverPrincess Academy
Ages 10+
Strong community and deep friendships form in this fantasy novel. Love of words and learning propel the heroine to become an invaluable resource within her community.

 

 

An App for Kids’ Academic Enrichment

wizard-school-cover


Wizard School

Ages 7+
This creative app taps into the user’s imagination and enthusiasm in true 21st century fashion. Videos, photos, drawings, and inventive challenges combine to inspire learning.

 

Kids’ Movies with Inspiring Academic Role Models

akeelah-and-the-bee
Akeelah and the Bee
Ages 7+
A girl’s journey to a big spelling bee is supported by her community. At times she struggles to embrace her own intelligence and worth.

 

 

spellbound


Spellbound

Ages 9+
This documentary follows several competitors for the National Spelling Bee. Hard work, family, and big dreams are part of the equation that helps get these kids on the big stage.

 

on-the-way-to-school
On the Way to School

Ages 9+
Most Americans have a simple way to get to school; a short walk, bike ride, or trip in a car or bus will get us there. For other kids around the world, it’s not easy, or comfortable, but it’s worth it because they desperately want an education.

 

the-miracle-workerThe Miracle Worker
Ages 9+
The story of Helen Keller and her teacher is beyond inspiring. Helen has no understanding of language or of interacting normally with family members. Through ingenuity, perseverance and patience, teacher Annie Sullivan opens up the world of words and language to her student. Annie is a testament to all teachers’ hard work. A must-see.

 

rudy
Rudy
Ages 10+
Determination and hard work are the life lessons strongly represented by the main character in this fine film. With the help of a kindly teacher, teammates and friends, the underdog Rudy fulfills his life’s dream. Definitely best for tweens and older, due to language, a death and sports violence.

 

See a list of academic classes near you > >

Find a tutor > >

TV for Kids’ Academic Inspiration and Fun

little-house-on-the-prairie
Little House on the Prairie
Ages 7+
The one-room schoolhouse in this beloved series is not the only location where education takes place. Pioneer children living on a farm learn a variety of practical tasks and life skills every day. History and geography are natural discussion topics when watching as a family.

 

mythbustersMythbusters
Ages 8+
Exhibiting a strong level of curiosity, the crew of Mythbusters sets out in each episode to prove an idea, sometimes an urban legend, sometimes an idiom like “a bull in a china shop.” There are often explosions, items being thrown into walls, or things launched skyward, all in the name of science and discovery.

 

More Mature TV and Movies About Academics

These titles have more mature themes and language, so they’re recommended for older teen audiences.

dream-schoolDream School
Ages 14+
The mission at this school is to inspire and encourage teens at risk of dropping out. Celebrity mentors and teachers have their work cut out for them. Be aware: Strong language and personal circumstances mean this is best for teens and older.

dead-poets-society
Dead Poets Society

Ages 14+
This classic is an inspiring coming-of-age story that celebrates creativity and a free spirit. There are mature themes and activities, so this is best for older tweens and teens.

 

good-will-hunting
Good Will Hunting

Ages 14+ (rated R)
This Academy Award winner demonstrates that academics can open doors for people from all classes (e.g., a working-class Boston youth), but you have to believe in yourself and want to walk through those new doors.

 

freedom-writers
Freedom Writers

Ages 13+
An idealistic high school teacher discovers the way to connect with her students is to help find their similarities. Her emphasis on really listening to her students is notable. The hip-hop soundtrack will appeal to teen viewers.

 

 

stand-and-deliver
Stand and Deliver
Ages 13+
Sacrifice and hard work are front-and-center in this inspiring movie. It is based on the story of a real math teacher who went to extreme lengths to teach his kids math, and eventually AP Calculus. The students struggle with life issues outside of school, but while in school they become driven and engaged. Real-life scenes can be rough, and the language is questionable at times, but relevant to the movie.

to-sir-with-love

 

To Sir, With Love
Ages 13+
This classic is another inspired teacher tale. Real-life issues such as class and race are addressed, while the teacher works hard to connect with and discipline his students so that they are ready and able to learn.

 

See a list of academic classes near you > >

Find a tutor > >

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When Kids Aren’t Getting What They Need at School






Want homework help? Solid study skills? Better test scores? Here, experts offer insights to help you find the right academic programs for your kids.

By Laura Quaglio

child who wants academic help
You’re diligent about driving your kids to soccer practice and piano lessons. But now that midterm grades are drifting in, you might be wondering if it’s time to consider adding academic enrichment to that list of after school activities. Not surprisingly, the educators we interviewed for this article offer a simple answer: Yes! But their reasons — and the added perks of after school academic classes, tutoring sessions, and camps — might help you decide to make the leap this year.

For starters, kids everywhere can benefit from being immersed in a supportive environment where they will have their individual needs addressed and met. Just look at how much colleges “sell” their small student-teacher ratios, and you’ll see how appealing it might be for your child to be one of, say, 10 students, instead of 30 or more kids vying for a teacher’s attention.

See a list of academic classes near you > >

Find a tutor > >

Also, as parents, we know that practice equals progress. It’s why we invest in soccer camp and piano lessons. And though our kids “could” practice penalty shots and major scales on their own at home, or we “could” do that with them, chances are it’s not going to happen. And if it does, it may not be pretty.

The big difference between choosing an academic enrichment program (instead of enrolling kids in sports or the arts) is that many of us don’t know where to begin or what questions to ask. Because we know how vital our kids’ minds are, we’re afraid to foray into this area at all. Before we can sell our kids on the idea, we need to have confidence in our decision.

For some expert guidance, we turned to three experts for their insights into the different types of academic classes, camps, and tutors available to kids:

  • Darrell Dela Cruz, the education coordinator of Communication Academy in Cupertino, California, whose goal is to help students develop confidence in their communication skills, which can help them be more confident and successful in all aspects of their lives
  • Abby Hunt, director of brand and communications at Wyzant, the nation’s largest online market site for finding tutors and coaches for learners of all ages
  • Winnie Wong, PhD, founder and director of instruction at EDNova Academy, in San Mateo, California, which aims to inspire, guide, and nurture the next generation STEM leaders and empower students with knowledge so they can choose who they want to be

Before we get to the questions you might want to ask of any academic program, let’s take a quick look at some of the main differences between tutors, camps, and classes.

Tutors, Classes, and Camps: Some Key Points

Each of these types of academic enrichment offers its own unique benefits. “If you need help in a very specific subject, you’re not always going to find a tutor right down the street,” says Hunt. The same is true of local classes or camps. That’s why Wyzant offers connections to 80,000 tutors, many of whom are willing to offer online lessons and support. Tutoring also provides a highly customized approach, allowing each child to receive the full attention of one instructor.

On the other hand, taking academic classes in a small-group setting teaches kids to work together cooperatively, to communicate as a group, and to listen to different viewpoints and ideas from different students. Classes result in steady improvement over time. “To cultivate a good habit, you have to take time,” says Dr. Wong. Classes also allow students to learn about a particular subject matter and then build upon that knowledge steadily.

Camps, though, will immerse kids in a topic, giving them a very strong foundation of knowledge, says Dela Cruz. “Kids are preparing, practicing, presenting, and receiving feedback, all within a short period of time,” he says. This provides them with tangible results quickly — and leads to the formation of strong bonds between the kids and their instructors and fellow students, since they spend so much time together for several consecutive days.

Classes generally result in steadier improvement, and kids will retain the concepts for longer because they continue to practice over time. One suggestion? If your kids take a camp and enjoy it, consider enrolling them in weekly classes or at least following up with another camp, which can serve as a refresher course so they won’t lose what they have gained.

Questions to Ask Instructors and Program Directors

When you’ve narrowed down what type of program you’d like to try, consider asking some or all of these questions to help you find a location that’s a good fit for your family.

What is your teaching philosophy?

Many after school educators share a common frustration about the school system: that it causes kids to focus on failure. “Failing is not the opposite of success,” says Dr. Wong. “It’s the way to success. If you don’t fail, you won’t learn anything and be able to improve.” Her approach is to instill a sense of curiosity into her students and give them the tools to glean information about any subject from the internet and experts in the field.

Other locations may focus on “teaching to the test” — helping kids pass or improve in a particular standardized test or in a certain topic such as a Common Core subject. If you’re looking for your child to make quantitative improvements in test scores, that may be the right avenue for you.

And different tutors — even those referred by the same service – will each have their own unique approach to sharing their knowledge, offering support, and measuring success and improvements.

Be sure you find a location and instructor whose teaching philosophy matches your parenting philosophy and academic goals. Think of it this way: If you want a good key lime pie, you’ll be happier going to a bakery that specializes in it than you would if you visited a cupcake bakery and explained your recipe for pie.

When will I see an improvement in grades and test scores?

According to Hunt, research showed that students generally see one grade improvement in the class (in grades K through 12) for 8 hours of tutoring. That means four 2-hour sessions or eight 1-hour sessions — whatever combination. And that was across all subjects. However, keep an eye out for other less-quantifiable improvements, too.

“Kids will develop their own curiosity. They will be challenged and frustrated, but they will learn how to resolve that in their own way with a lot of support. And they’ll want to learn more. Although good grades are important to maintain, it is not our main focus. We aim to assist in cultivating a learner who sees pass grades. We want our students to appreciate and value the process of learning. We believe knowledge is power. Good grade is a natural by product of proactive learning. If they cultivate their curiosity and build a strong foundation for learning, the grade will come in.”

Many establishments actually promise to raise standardized test scores or report-card grades by the session’s end. If you don’t see an improvement in any way after a few weeks, ask the instructor why. If they don’t have a response that satisfies you, consider seeking a new instructor who is a better fit.

How large are class sizes?

“The main benefit of a tutor is that one-to-one interaction with an expert,” says Hunt. Some tutors, though, might offer small-group instruction at a reduced rate. And sometimes tutoring is offered online.

Many academic classes and camps welcome slightly larger numbers, but they usually keep groups small enough for kids to enjoy the perks of both private instruction and group communication. For instance, at both EDNova Academy and Communication Academy, class sizes typically max out at 12 kids.

These student-teacher ratios mean that instructors can “learn how students think,” says Dr. Wong. Some kids will rush to finish a task and overlook important details. Others won’t take risks so they don’t challenge their limits. She tries to identify kids’ strengths and weaknesses, then help each child get their weaknesses “out of the way.” This is much easier for an instructor to do if they have a smaller number of kids in their class. Think about what you want your child to get out of the instruction and just how much one-on-one is really necessary — or whether they’ll do just fine in a bigger group.

How will you communicate with parents and schools?

“We like to talk to parents about what they’re looking for,” says Dela Cruz. For instance, if a child is in a public speaking or debate class, the parent might want the child to work on being louder or speaking more clearly. Then the instructor will keep that in mind when working with that child.

“A tutor should be communicating with the parent to create a curriculum,” says Hunt. This should be based upon what the goals are and how the child learns, whether it’s a hands-on approach, reading a text, watching videos, or a combination. Parents, too, should communicate with the instructor, she says. “Where do you think the child needs help first? If you’re not sure, ask their teachers at school. The more coordination between the teacher and parent and tutor, the better the experience will be.”

What takes place in a session, class, or camp?

For EDNova Academy students, education is project-based. For instance, for nine or 10 weeks, kids might focus on 3D printing. Not only will kids learn how to make something using this technology, they’ll immerse themselves in the subject. They will research the history of 3D printing and why it has become popular. They’ll learn what it is used for and brainstorm possible uses for it in the future. “They will learn they can print a 3D kidney or a 3D chocolate,” she says. “That kind of thing really sparks their interest in learning. They say, Let me find out more!”

Also be sure you understand the overall time commitment. The classes at Communication Academy are usually held once a week for 8, 10, or 12 weeks, while camps run Monday through Friday in two 3-hour sessions (one a.m. and one p.m.), with kids being able to opt for one or the other or to stay for both. At EDNova Academy, kids spend 3 hours per week with their after school instructor (divided into two sessions).

The best way to learn about the curriculum — per day or per session — is to go over it with the instructor. Will your child be able to raise their standardized test scores by a certain number of points after 10 weeks? Does the school expect your child to attend on a long-term basis, as they would if they were, say, taking voice lessons? Will the instructor also be doing breakout sessions in unrelated areas (such as a volleyball break during coding camp)? You and your family need to find the best fit for your time frame and end goals.

Will there be homework?

Some programs require about 30 minutes of homework per week, just to reinforce principles. Others may require some prep work, as in practicing a speech to deliver for the next class. Still others require no homework at all. For instance, kids attend Dr. Wong’s program for an hour-and-a-half twice a week, so she only gives them extra work if they request it.

Either way, Dr. Wong recommends talking to your kids about what they are learning and letting them teach you. Kids love to share what insights they have gained and surprising facts they learned, especially if these are things that their parents don’t already know! Plus, teaching will help your kids reinforce what they learned – but that can be our little secret.

What qualifications do your instructors have?

Meet with your child’s intended instructor before signing up for a course, class, workshop, or camp. Dr. Wong advises seeking a program whose owner, founder, and/or director is passionate about what they do and has significant experience in the subject matter. “I do math and science and engineering and technology because I’m a domain expert in these,” she says. “I don’t teach subjects that I don’t know.”

It’s also helpful to sit in on a class and listen to the teacher’s method of instruction. A person may have a master’s degree in a subject but not be great at conveying what they know to others – particularly young people.

Also, try to assess the person’s actual degree of expertise. “Just because someone took a few classes doesn’t mean they’re an expert,” adds Hunt. “Some people want a certified teacher. But I also think grad students are really good.”

Another tip from Hunt: “If possible, get a background check. Most tutors elect to have them, and any of our students can ask any of our tutors to get one.”

Does your program offer any other perks?

Will kids make connections in their field of interest, for example, or will they be able to compete in, say, a debate? Just as some martial arts schools go to competitions, so do some academies for math, debate, or writing, to name a few. Because of Dr. Wong’s university connections, some of her students have been able to visit expos and workshops at University of California, Berkeley. Consider which extras would be most beneficial and appealing to your child when looking for an academic program for them. But don’t get sidetracked by this. Remember your primary goals are just that: primary.

Can I attend an open house?

Once you’ve narrowed the field to a few potential candidates, the best way to choose an academic program is to pay a visit in person. Many academic programs invite families to tour their facilities, sit in on a class, meet the instructors, and gain other insights into the program. Some even hold formal “open houses” each year. This can help parents and kids get an idea of whether their child might fit well with the program and other students. (It’s also great practice for attending college open houses in the future.) If you do get to attend such an event, talk with parents and current students, as well as the staff. Find out why other families like the location, and ask which instructors they favor and why. (But keep in mind that your child’s experience may be different, even with the same educator.) If there’s not an upcoming open house at a program you’re considering, ask the director if they can set up a similar visit for you and your kids.

How can I help enhance what my child is learning?

Always remember that you are and will always be a key player in your child’s education. Trust your gut about what’s right for your child when choosing a program— and when choosing to opt out of one and try another. And above all: Be your child’s biggest proponent and cheerleader.

“I recommend not always explaining what kids did wrong,” says Dela Cruz. Schools are notorious for sending home papers marked up with what is incorrect. So children hear enough of that already. “The kids worked hard on this, they see those red marks, and they feel they have failed,” he says. What can parents do? “Look at what your child did right and tell them that first,” he advises. Then look at what they need to improve on, and treat it as that: the next logical step toward their next success.

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